Louis armstrong and his all-stars louis armstrong und seine all-stars st. louis blues


With his instantly recognizable gravelly voice, Armstrong was also an influential singer, demonstrating great dexterity as an improviser, bending the lyrics and melody of a song for expressive purposes. He was also very skilled at scat singing . Armstrong is renowned for his charismatic stage presence and voice almost as much as for his trumpet playing. Armstrong's influence extends well beyond jazz, and by the end of his career in the 1960s, he was widely regarded as a profound influence on popular music in general. Armstrong was one of the first truly popular African-American entertainers to "cross over", whose skin color was secondary to his music in an America that was extremely racially divided at the time. He rarely publicly politicized his race, often to the dismay of fellow African Americans, but took a well-publicized stand for desegregation in the Little Rock crisis . His artistry and personality allowed him socially acceptable access to the upper echelons of American society which were highly restricted for black men of his era.

Don't let the budget price and generic packaging lead to the impression that Louis Armstrong and His All-Stars is a substandard release musically. Although the All-Stars are less heralded in comparison to the classic Hot Five or Hot Seven sides, this late-'40s return to his small-combo roots (five players, plus the requisite girl singer, Velma Middleton ) was the last truly great jazz band Armstrong led before his move into orchestrated pop records in the '50s. Although the skimpy liner notes don't state where this show was recorded, the All-Stars lineup listed -- Earl Hines , Jack Teagarden , Barney Bigard, Big Sid Catlett, and Arvell Shaw -- only played together from February 1948 to May 1949. It's likely that this disc is a radio transcription from a series of shows Armstrong and the All-Stars played at Ciro's in Philadelphia June 2-12, 1948. (Actually, the last track, the first studio recording of this band's unofficial theme song "Jack Armstrong Blues," is from June 10, 1947, and features Jack Cary on piano.) Wherever the recording took place, the band sounds super tight, with Teagarden 's sly trombone answering Armstrong 's vocals and trumpet and Hines ' barrelhouse piano driving the combo. Though it's a common perception that Armstrong lost his fire by the '40s, this set is a solid piece of old-fashioned small-combo jazz.


Louis Armstrong And His All-Stars Louis Armstrong Und Seine All-Stars St. Louis BluesLouis Armstrong And His All-Stars Louis Armstrong Und Seine All-Stars St. Louis BluesLouis Armstrong And His All-Stars Louis Armstrong Und Seine All-Stars St. Louis BluesLouis Armstrong And His All-Stars Louis Armstrong Und Seine All-Stars St. Louis Blues

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